Why does the MS Society of Canada help promote unhealthy food?

by Jennifer Sweeney

MSocanada

This past year, the MS Society of Canada has embarked on a new fundraising strategy to appeal to “Canadians.” At first I thought it wasn’t a bad idea since the rate of multiple sclerosis is higher in Canada than anywhere else in the world.

The intent was to challenge us to raise money to help research and to find a cure. Yet, the search for a cause seems to have taken a back seat to the search for a cure, much like the idea of conquering cancer.

Coming soon is a day across the country where people are encouraged to eat fast food and one dollar for one type of burger sold will be donated to the MS Society. I didn’t support it last year and thought it was easy enough to ignore and suggest that people donate a dollar or more directly to the MS Society and spare the assault on their health.

MSburger

But this year, the promotion is even a bigger deal, along with a sadly-misguided long video showing people in wheelchairs and MSers in tears at A&W.

Yes, a cure would be wonderful and would mean so much to all of us affected with the horrible disease.

But all I could think when I saw this video was how sad and distressing it was that many of the very things that are implicated in poor health are promoted in this video by encouraging poor nutrition and eating junk food.

As a die-hard supporter of Dr. Terry Wahls, the doctor who got herself out of a wheelchair by eating for nutrient density, I don’t understand why the MS Society thinks it’s all right to enter into this type of fundraising partnership.

Instead of eating an unhealthy meal on August 27, please use your money to buy some organic food for yourself and your family and take steps to stop this epidemic of disease in Canada.

2017-12-13T11:46:10+00:00

About the Author:

Connie Jorsvik
Connie Jorsvik, BSN, Owner Connie Jorsvik was an RN for 25 years—15 of that in cardiac critical care—and left her profession because of her own health challenges. During the years she was a nurse, she was always a patient advocate above all other duties she performed. She saved many lives because she stood up to physicians; because she was meticulous in her care and observations; and worked to never-ever take short-cuts with policies, procedures and protocols (they’re there for a reason).